Issue 283: Sustainability In Action

View the complete issue below!

Spring/Summer 2022

As the seasons shift, I am reminded of what a joy it is to get outside in nature and community. Every morning, I hear the birds more and more, I feel the sun coming in the windows and my brain craves getting off the computer and out the door. There are more people out and about town runner errands on foot, more people to share friendly smiles and ‘hello’s with downtown. There are even tourists wandering about the waterfront!

I began running during the pandemic as a way to work towards a steady goal while everything else seemed a moving target, and I have been loving running in the woods. I recently relocated to Nanaimo, and am enjoying the new trails I am finding. While gathering contributors to this issue around sustainability, I have wondered what the summer and fall will bring. I breathe the forest air deeply knowing that in August I may have to quit running outside altogether for fear of inhaling too much smoke in wildfire season.

I recognize that inhaling smoke is a small problem in relation to large-scale environmental disasters; I haven’t feared losing my home, I have not lost my community or my connections to others due to fire or flood. But perhaps, like you, climate disasters seem to inch closer and closer to my life and mind, impacting parts of my day, and I wonder what things will look like and how much adaptation will I need to make in the future other than just avoiding August air quality warnings by running on a treadmill?

This issue brings together our largest compilation of contributors yet, telling stories about sustainability; from environmental aspects to social and community aspects. I hope that we all take the time to reflect on the need for sustainability in our lives and that these articles inspire you to take action in some way to make a better future in your communities. I hope that you join me in imagining communities with more opportunities to explore in nature, more community members to say hello to, and a better future for us all.

Leia

Categories
Roundup

President's Report

In each issue of Roundup, I will dedicate my report to giving you – the membership – an update on the work performed behind the scenes by your elected Council and the Committees they serve on.

Categories
Roundup

The Old Lady Has New Underpants!

Over the years, the Potato House has gone through various restoration projects to allow the organization to increase its capacity for tours and programs, while preserving the heritage character of the architecture and decor. Each project is planned with the organization’s heritage and sustainability values at the forefront.

Categories
Roundup

(Re)framing Sustainability Strategies in Museums

From data collection and reporting all the way to social marketing, strategic planning, eco-responsible operations, inclusive and diverse workplaces, and sustainability and/or DEI managers, there are business concepts and strategies that should be of particular interest to museums as the latter face rapid changes within their operating contexts.

Categories
Roundup

Semá:th Xo:tsa Sts’ólemeqwelh Sxó:tsa

To reclaim the memory of the lake, the Reach initiated a collaborative, multidisciplinary partnership with a number of Stó:lō leaders and knowledge keepers. Through a series of interrelated projects... we have since sought to work respectfully and cooperatively with our Stó:lō hosts to build intergenerational and intercultural understanding about Indigenous history, land, and resource use in the Fraser Valley.

Categories
Roundup

Community Sustainability and the Newly Renamed qathet Museum and Archives

Within the context of sustainability, reconciliation may be seen as a process that strengthens community relationships by building inclusive and safe spaces for the people of tomorrow. For a small-town community museum located on northern Sunshine Coast, the journey to reach this sustainability goal has recently gained momentum as the former Powell River Historical Museum and Archives Association (PRHMAA) has finalized the process of changing its colonial name.

Categories
Roundup

Environmental Education and the Historic House

I’ve seen a growing number of historic house museums with extensive grounds incorporating the topic of climate change into their narrative, but only when discussing their grounds. Our global responsibility to combat climate change, however, doesn’t stop when we go inside. And at King Manor, we believe the period room is an untapped resource for environmental education.

Categories
Roundup

Pillars of Power: Relevant Programs are Key to Sustainable Museums

Such relevant programs can help sustain museums by engaging people with historical records of value. Community members, students, and visitors can connect to and better understand history by handling artifacts, listening to oral stories from an earlier time, and even participating in hands-on activities.

Categories
Roundup

Being Small is No Problem At All!

Sustainability: it’s one of those words that can mean a lot of different things. And for precisely that reason, it can be very difficult to figure out just how to put it into action in our museums. For those of us in small museums, this can be even more challenging as it’s yet another thing on a never-ending to-do list.

Categories
Roundup

Pocket Pancakes and Carbon Considerations

I worry about climate change. I make dozens of micro-decisions each day to try to be less wasteful and more considerate of the environment. However, I confess I have not yet made any major changes to my lifestyle to reduce my impact on Earth. I don’t own an electric car, my stove is gas and the roof of my house isn’t fitted with solar panels. In 2021, though, green initiatives went beyond the personal and started directly overlapping with my work: Ingenium’s travelling exhibition program began offsetting the carbon resulting from shipping its exhibits throughout Canada.

Categories
Roundup

Under the Threat of Fire, a Community Comes Together

On the morning of Saturday, August 7, most of Vernon was placed under an Evacuation Alert. The fire was even closer to O’Keefe Ranch, however. So, rather than wait for an official Evacuation Order, the curatorial committee decided to evacuate valuables from the ranch immediately. Vernon Museum would be the safest destination.

 

The BC Museums Association gratefully acknowledges funding support of our Climate Action and Leadership for Museums Initiative.

 

Keep an eye out for information from these BCMA supporters in the articles!

Are you interested in supporting the BCMA? Learn more about opportunities to advertise with us here.

Digital Planning for the Cultural Sector, Professional Development Certificate

Position your organization to thrive in a digital economy.

This micro-credential looks at ways technology is being used in the cultural sector and gives you the in-demand knowledge and skills you need to help your organization thrive in the digital economy. Embrace the opportunity that technology in the cultural sector can offer. BC residents are eligible for 25% tuition subsidy.

Learn more

 

We are changing how people will learn about the past in the future

 

YOUR AD HERE

Highly customizable and mobile-optimized advertisements are a low-barrier way to increase awareness of your brand to the 1,000+readers in BC’s arts, culture, and heritage community.

Click to learn more!

Check out our previous issue for more!

Roundup Issue 282

Maintaining Momentum

We wanted to know how you were taking the year into review and maintaining momentum on the issues that matter most to you and your community. From tackling burnout to indigenous engagement, managing the digital shift to opening new museums, we got some wonderful stories about moving forward in the sector!