IBPOC Museum Professionals Network

Podcast Series

More about the IBPOC Network

 

This network is supported in part by the RBC Foundation in support of RBC Future Launch.

The network is also supported by the Deux Mille Foundation.

A podcast for us, by us.

Welcome to the IBPOC Network Podcast: a space where racialized folks in our sector can share our stories.

In each episode, Network Coordinator Jazmin sits down with a professional or volunteer in the cultural sector to chat about the projects they are passionate about, why they do the work they do, and what advice they would give to emerging IBPOC professionals.

We make up 23% of the workforce in this sector, and that’s not enough. Learn what drives us to do this work, and how we can empower each other to make change in every space we’re in.

Interested in being on the podcast? Contact Jazmin at communications@museum.bc.ca and share your story!

Episode 1: Dr. Sharanjit Sandhra and the Sikh Heritage Museum at Gur Sikh Gurdwara

Jazmin and Sharn chat while inside the historic Sikh gurdwara. 

Listen here

Episode 2: Nicole Priessl and the Burnaby Village Museum

Jazmin and Nicole chat while onsite the Indigenous programming spaces in the village.

Listen here

Pilot Episode: Connecting with Amina Chergui

Past Network Coordinator Sarah Wang chats with Amina Chergui from UBC MOA.

Listen here

Why the name IBPOC (Indigenous, Black, and People of Colour)?

Originally launched under the name BIPOC Network, Indigenous BCMA members reached out and suggested using the term IBPOC to recognize that the discussions and activities facilitated through this network are taking place on the ceded, unceded, and sovereign territories of Indigenous communities across what is now referred to as British Columbia. The BCMA recognizes that we are uninvited guests on these territories and wish to center this network around respect and reconciliation.

We recognize that grouping such distinct identities together suggests an interchangeability that fails to articulate the differential ways that racialized people experience race and racism and will continue to evolve and update our language in consultant with the community.